E2E children's books — FINALISTS in the 2018 Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Awards

We were thrilled to receive the news that two of our latest publications have been selected as finalists in the 2018 Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Awards!

ForewordIndies_2018_Finalists.jpg

Congratulations to author Jayneen Sanders and illustrators Sarah Jennings and Diane Ewen!

Finalist in Juvenile Non-Fiction: Let’s Talk About Body Boundaries, Consent and Respect

Finalist in Children’s Picture Books, Early Reader: Who Am I? I Am Me!


As part of its mission to discover, review, and share the best books from university and independent publishers, Foreword Magazine, Inc. (@forewordreviews) hosts an annual awards program each year. Finalists represent the best books published in 2018. After more than 2,000 individual titles spread across 56 genres were submitted for consideration, the list of finalists was determined by Foreword’s editorial team. Winners will be decided by an expert team of booksellers and librarians—representing Foreword’s readership.

The 2018 Foreword INDIES winners are scheduled to be announced Friday, June 14, 2019! Wish us luck!!


Foreword INDIES press release: https://www.forewordreviews.com/awards/finalists/2018/press-release/

Full List of finalists for 2018: https://www.forewordreviews.com/awards/finalists/2018/all/

Finalists by Category: https://www.forewordreviews.com/awards/finalists/2018/


Find out more about these two books, and the others in our collection at www.e2epublishing.info/shop 

What is a Body Safety Education program?

What is a Body Safety Education program?

Many people are uninformed as to what constitutes a Body Safety Education program and fear that such a program would discuss sex and sexual abuse with their children. This is not the case. Body Safety Education aims to empower children with skills and knowledge that will lessen the likelihood of them becoming victims of childhood sexual abuse.

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10 Best Children’s Books to Help Kids with Anxiety

Here are ten fantastic books to help children understand, manage and overcome anxiety, worry and stress — providing through story, lessons and coping strategies that will stay with them as they grow up, facing the challenges that life throws at us.

1. How Big Are Your Worries Little Bear?
by Jayneen Sanders

Little Bear is a worrier. He worries about everything! But with Mama Bear’s help, he soon learns his worries are not so big after all.
Through this engaging and beautifully illustrated story, children will learn that everyday worries and fears can be overcome. It just takes a willingness to share with a helpful listener, and an understanding that making mistakes is how we learn.
Also included are helpful Discussion Questions for parents, caregivers and educators, and extra hints to help children manage anxiety.
Available in Australia from www.e2epublishing.info
and on Amazon for US [http://amzn.to/2iniWZ9] and UK [http://amzn.to/2AWRgFg] customers

 

2. Hey Warrior!
by Karen Young

A fantastic book to help children understand what actually happens in their brain when they experience anxiety. Kids can do amazing things with the right information. Understanding why anxiety feels the way it does, and where the physical symptoms come from, is a powerful step in turning anxiety around. This book is an amazing resource for kids 5 years and above who feel anxious and overwhelmed by those feelings.
Available at http://www.heysigmund.com/product/hey-warrior/

 

3. The Huge Bag of Worries
by Virginia Ironside

Wherever Jenny goes, her worries follow her — in a big blue bag. They are there when she goes swimming, when she is watching TV, and even when she is in the lavatory. Jenny decides they will have to go. But who can help her? A great book to use with anxious children as it helps sort worries through and make them seem more manageable. It emphasizes that we all have worries and what to do about them.
Available on Amazon for US [http://amzn.to/2iWiqVY] and UK [http://amzn.to/2jhUVDM] customers

 

4. When My Worries Get too Big
by Kari Dunn Buron

More than any other issue, 'losing control' can cause major problems for children. Through the irresistible character of Nicholas, this book gives young children an opportunity to explore with parents or teachers their own feelings as they react to events in their daily lives while learning some useful relaxation techniques. Children who use the simple strategies presented in this charming book, illustrated by the author, will find themselves relaxed and ready to work or play.
Available on Amazon for US [http://amzn.to/2iWkhtU] and UK [http://amzn.to/2iUw7Vm] customers

 

5. What to Do When You Worry Too Much
by Dawn Huebner

"What to Do When You Worry Too Much" is an interactive self-help book designed to guide 6-12 year olds and their parents through the cognitive-behavioral techniques most often used in the treatment of generalized anxiety. Engaging, encouraging, and easy to follow, this book educates, motivates, and empowers children to work towards change. It includes a note to parents.
Available on Amazon for US [http://amzn.to/2kmUY4x] and UK [http://amzn.to/2iYJynm] customers

 

6. It's Okay to Make Mistakes
by Todd Parr

This book, suitable for younger children, embraces life's happy accidents, the mistakes and mess-ups that can lead to self-discovery. Todd Parr brings a timely theme to life with his signature bold, kid-friendly illustrations and a passion for making readers feel good about themselves, encouraging them to try new things, experiment, and dare to explore new paths.
Available on Amazon for US [http://amzn.to/2AtlK14] and UK [http://amzn.to/2ipKRrv] customers

 


7. Wilma Jean the Worry Machine
by Julia Cook

Everyone feels fear, worry and apprehension from time to time, but when these feelings prevent a person from doing what he/she wants and/or needs to do, anxiety becomes a disability. This fun and humorous book addresses the problem of anxiety in a way that relates to children of all ages. It offers creative strategies for parents and teachers to use that can lessen the severity of anxiety. The goal of the book is to give children the tools needed to feel more in control of their anxiety.
Available on Amazon for US [http://amzn.to/2ji0diC] and UK [http://amzn.to/2imynkq] customers

 

8. David and the Worry Beast
by Anne Marie Guanci

David could not stop thinking about the basket he had missed at the end of the big game. He was worried that he might do it again. He was worried that his team mates would be angry with him. He was worried that his parents would not be proud of him. He was also worried about an upcoming math test. In fact, David was worried a lot. " Luckily, David finally confided in his parents and school nurse, both of whom gave him support and techniques for controlling the "worry beast" within him.
Available on Amazon for US [http://amzn.to/2zRYbfc] and UK [http://amzn.to/2imyqN8] customers

 

9. When Worry Takes Hold
by Liz Haske

One night just before the lights went out, Worry snuck into Maya's mind. Worry grew bigger and bigger until there was no space left for anything else; just darkness and fear. Maya finally finds Courage, through the form of a calming breath, and learns how to break free from Worry's hold.
Available on Amazon for US [http://amzn.to/2inzAI9] and UK [http://amzn.to/2iXpvFR] customers

 

10.  100th Day Worries
by Margery Cuyler

When Jessica's teacher tells everyone in class to find 100 things to bring to school for their 100th day, Jessica starts to worry. She wants to bring something really good but what? 100 marshmallows? No, too sticky. 100 yo-yos? Nah, that's silly. When Jessica reaches the 99th day, she really starts to worry. She still doesn't know what to bring! This book explores general anxiety through the familiar scenario of school by providing the reader with helpful strategies to mange everyday worries.
Available on Amazon for US [http://amzn.to/2BLOjF9] and UK [http://amzn.to/2iXq02H] customers

 

For more great books and resources to empower children, see the complete range at http://www.e2epublishing.info/books

1 Comment

Jay Sanders

Jayneen (Jay) Sanders is an experienced primary school teacher and a successful children's book author. She is also the mother of three teenage girls and has been a primary school councillor for over seven years. Her time spent in primary schools inspired her to ask: ‘What are we doing in schools to protect our children from sexual interference?’ When she realised very little was actually being done, she decided to write a book to help parents, carers and teachers to broach the subject of self-protection and to encourage children to speak up.

Children's Books with a Difference

As a teacher, writer and mother I am devoted to the education of children. However, it is not their academic achievement that I am so focused upon. What is important to me, is that children:

• develop emotional and social intelligence

• are educated in age-appropriate Body Safety

• understand the terms ‘respect’ and ‘consent’

• know gender equality is non-negotiable.

These are the reasons why I write the children's books I do! Children are visual learners and what better way for them to talk about these important topics than through story.

I write both fiction and non-fiction texts, and my books are a hybrid of traditional children’s books with an educational thread. I always provide discussion questions for the adult reader to assist them in drawing out the child’s learning. Of course, some adults know exactly how to extend the conversation and embed the important message, but many are grateful for the scaffolding. A number of my books have child-centered questions on the page so the child can express how they interpreted the text and the illustrations, and the emotions they or the character may have felt. That way the child feels invested in the story and can share things that are also important to them. 

I am concerned that children are becoming less engaged with the people around them and more engaged with the technology that is so easily accessible. Empathy is about engaging with others. The research tells us empathy is a learned trait, and hence why I wrote my latest children’s book ‘You, Me and Empathy’. Teaching children to see the world from another person’s point of view is crucial to a kind, compassionate and empathetic society, and therefore, I believe teaching empathy from an early age is critical.

I am passionate about empowering children, and I am adamant there is a way to broach these challenging topics with children through well-crafted and engaging stories.

Jayneen Sanders

All Jayneen’s books are published by Educate2Empower Publishing an award-winning niché children's book publisher who specializes in children's books on BODY SAFETY, CONSENT, GENDER EQUALITY and RESPECTFUL RELATIONSHIPS. Educate2Empower Publishing also provides free resources for parents, carergivers and educators on these important topics. For more information go to: www.e2epublishing.info  All Jayneen's books are available on Amazon.

Comment

Jay Sanders

Jayneen (Jay) Sanders is an experienced primary school teacher and a successful children's book author. She is also the mother of three teenage girls and has been a primary school councillor for over seven years. Her time spent in primary schools inspired her to ask: ‘What are we doing in schools to protect our children from sexual interference?’ When she realised very little was actually being done, she decided to write a book to help parents, carers and teachers to broach the subject of self-protection and to encourage children to speak up.

Why I Wrote the Children’s Book ‘No Means No!’

Want to know more about this book? Visit the " No Means No! " page for more information on the content and testimonials from readers...

Want to know more about this book? Visit the "No Means No!" page for more information on the content and testimonials from readers...

About two years ago when I was a substitute teacher in a grade 1 class, I encountered a little girl of around 7 years old. For this blog, let’s call her Karli. Karli was a very shy child (unlike my own three outspoken daughters and myself as a child:)) but I respected this aspect of what I believed to be her innate nature. Karli was also one of those little girls that the boys seem to gravitate towards. Always buzzing around her and wanting to hug, kiss and hold her hand. Karli would respond with coy smiles and allow them to show the affection they wished to bestow upon her.

On my second day in the class, the boys’ and Karli’s behavior began to increasingly worry me. I asked Karli if she really wanted the boys to hug and kiss her. He response was, ‘No, I don’t’. At this point I said to her, ‘Well, Karli, you have the right to say NO to the boys.’ I showed her how she could stand firm and tall, put her hand out in front of her and say, ‘NO! I don’t like that!’. It really didn’t come as a surprise to me, that she actually couldn't do it. She became giggly and coy every time she tried to model my stance and actions.

To be frank, Karli was a very pretty girl and I expect adults and children alike thought so too. She most likely had learnt from a very young age that she was an object to be admired and being innately shy, she consequently put up with the hugs and kisses the boys (and I suspect adults) had always bestowed upon her.

By the third day, I had her standing in her super girl/pirate stance, with one hand on her hip and one hand outstretched saying, ‘NO! Means No!’ I have to admit it was hard for her, and it took some time for Karli to be able do this in front of me; but eventually and with practice she became comfortable to use her voice and firm body language.

After teaching Karli and her classmates, I decided there was a definite need to write a children’s book to empower young kids and give them a voice. It is crucial that children from a very young age know their body is their body, and that they have a right to say, ‘NO’ to unwanted touch. Our children’s bodies belong to them. If they don’t wish to hug or kiss an adult or another child, they have the right to say, ‘NO’. A polite high five or shake of the hand is perfectly fine. Adults and children alike, need to respect this ‘NO’; they also need to ask permission of a child if wanting to hug or kiss them. Of course in many child-adult relationships there may be an ongoing mutual understanding that hugs and kisses are okay, and that permission is not sought every time. But if the child doesn’t want a hug or a kiss on a particular occasion, than their ‘NO’ is also okay and to be respected.

Teaching a young child from the earliest of years consent and body autonomy is one of the greatest gifts you can give them. It provides a child with the confidence and assertiveness to say, ‘NO’ to unwanted touch (which includes bullying) and especially unsafe touch (see www.e2epublishing.info for children’s books on Body Safety). Child sexual predators will and do use use tickling and touching games to groom young children. If your child has the confidence to say, ‘NO’ to any form of unwanted touch, then you have given them a great gift, and they will have an awesome chance to grow into confident and assertive teenagers and adults.

 

Jayneen Sanders (aka Jay Dale) is a teacher, author, mother of three daughters and an active advocate for sexual abuse prevention education and respectful relationships to be taught both in the home and in schools.

Want to know more about this book? Visit the "No Means No!" page for more information on the content and testimonials from readers...

 

Was this article helpful to you? Take a look at the most recent articles in our Blog.

For more information on this topic and Jay’s children's books 'Some Secrets Should Never Be Kept', 'Pearl Fairweather Pirate Captain', ‘No Means No!’, ‘My Body! What I say Goes!’, ‘No Difference Between Us’, and her parents’ guide ‘Body Safety Education — A parents’ guide to protecting kids from sexual abuse’ go to e2epublishing.info

All books are also available on Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk

Comment

Jay Sanders

Jayneen (Jay) Sanders is an experienced primary school teacher and a successful children's book author. She is also the mother of three teenage girls and has been a primary school councillor for over seven years. Her time spent in primary schools inspired her to ask: ‘What are we doing in schools to protect our children from sexual interference?’ When she realised very little was actually being done, she decided to write a book to help parents, carers and teachers to broach the subject of self-protection and to encourage children to speak up.

Top 15 Must-Have Children’s Books on Personal Safety and Emotional Health


Keeping Kids Safe from Sexual Abuse

1. Some Secrets Should Never Be Kept

by Jayneen Sanders

Some Secrets Should Never Be Kept is a beautifully illustrated picture book that sensitively broaches the subject of keeping our children safe from inappropriate touch. We teach water safety and road safety but how do we teach 'body safety' to young children in a way that is neither frightening nor confronting? This book is an invaluable tool for parents, caregivers, teachers and health professionals. The comprehensive notes to the reader and discussion questions at the back of the book support both the reader and the child when discussing the story. Suitable for ages 3 to 12 years. A free 'body safety' song, supporting teacher's pack and other useful resources are also available from: www.somesecrets.info

Available in English, Spanish, French, Italian, German, Japanese and Chinese.

 

2. My Body Belongs to Me

by Jill Starishevsky

Without being taught about body boundaries, a child may be too young to understand when abuse is happening—or that it’s wrong. This straightforward, gentle book offers a tool parents, teachers, and counselors can use to help children feel, be, and stay safe. The rhyming story and simple, friendly illustrations provide a way to sensitively share and discuss the topic, guiding young children to understand that their private parts belong to them alone. The overriding message of My Body Belongs to Me is that if someone touches your private parts, tell your mom, your dad, your teacher, or another safe adult.


Sex Education

3. It’s Not the Stork!

by Robie H. Harris

Young children are curious about almost everything, especially their bodies. And young children are not afraid to ask questions. What makes me a girl? What makes me a boy? Why are some parts of girls' and boys' bodies the same and why are some parts different? How was I made? Where do babies come from? Is it true that a stork brings babies to mommies and daddies? It's Not The Stork! helps answer these endless and perfectly normal questions that preschool, kindergarten, and early elementary school children ask about how they began.

 

4. Where Did I Come From?

by Peter Mayle

Where Did I Come From? covers all the basic facts from love-making, orgasm, conception and growth inside the womb, through to the actual birth day. It names all the names and shows all the important parts of the body.

Where Did I Come From? tells the facts of life as they are - without any nonsense, and in a way that children can understand and parents enjoy.


Grief/Death

5. A Place in my Heart — Understanding Bereavement

by Annette Aubrey

Through rhyming, the author deals sensitively with bereavement reassuring young readers that emotions they may be experiencing are ‘normal’ and shared by others.

 

 

6. Badger’s Parting Gifts

by Susan Varley

Badger is so old that he knows he will soon die. He tries to prepare his friends for this event, but when he does die, they are still grief-stricken. Gradually they come to terms with their grief by remembering all the practical things Badger taught them, and so Badger lives on in his friends' memories of him.

 

7. Isaac and the Red Jumper

by Amanda Seyderhelm

Picture book for 5-12 years about child bereavement. To be read by a parent, counsellor, teacher to a bereaved child. Full colour illustrations, and a list of questions at the back of the book to help children heal their grief process using creative activities. Isaac is heartbroken when his best friend Freddie dies. His house freezes, and his red jumper turns grey with grief. His friends try to console him but it's only after Isaac receives a special visit from Freddie that he understands love and friendship last forever, and are alive in spirit. Isaac and the Red Jumper will appeal to anyone who is bereaved, and is looking for a creative way to heal. Amanda Seyderhelm is a PTUK Certified Therapeutic Play Practitioner.


Mental Illness

8. Can I Catch It Like a Cold?

By Centre for Addiction &n Mental Health

In simple, straightforward language, the book explains what depression is and how it is treated. It also prepares a child for working with a helping professional. And perhaps most important, it reassures a child that he or she is not alone.


Divorce/Separation

9. Mum and Dad Glue

by Kes Gray

A little boy tries to find a pot of parent glue to stick his mum and dad back together. His parents have come undone and he wants to mend their marriage, stick their smiles back on and make them better. This rhyming story is brilliantly told with a powerful message that even though his parents may be broken, their love for him is not.

 

10. Dinosaurs Divorce

by Laurene Krasny Brown

Dinosaurs Divorce will help children understand divorce and what it means.


Trauma/Violence/Anxiety

11. How Are You Feeling Today Baby Bear?

by Jane Evans

A gentle story to help children aged 2 to 6 years who have lived with violence in their home. Baby Bear lives in a home with the Big Bears, and loves to chase butterflies and make mud pies - they make Baby Bear's tummy fill with sunshine. Then, one night, Baby Bear hears a big storm downstairs in the house and in the morning, Baby Bear's tummy starts to feel grey and rainy. How will such a small bear cope with these big new feelings? This sensitive, charming storybook is written to help children who have lived with violence at home to begin to explore and name their feelings. Accompanied by notes for adults on how to use each page of the story to start conversations, it also features fun games and activities to help to understand and express difficult emotions. It will be a useful book for social workers, counsellors, domestic violence workers and all grown-ups working with children.

 

 

12. A Terrible Thing Happened

by Margaret Holmes

This gently told and tenderly illustrated story is for children who have witnessed any kind of violent or traumatic episode, including physical abuse, school or gang violence, accidents, homicide, suicide, and natural disasters such as floods or fire. An afterword by Sash a J. Mudlaff written for parents and other caregivers offers extensive suggestions for helping traumatized children, including a list of other sources that focus on specific events.

Note from Jane: I have used this book many times with children from very young up to 10 to 11 years as a way to let them fill in the blanks using gentle suggestions of possible feelings, often helping children who lack the names for their unprocessed feelings. The book can also be used with children who are dealing with grief.

 

13. The Huge Bag of Worries

by Virginia Ironside

Wherever Jenny goes, her worries follow her - in a big blue bag. They are there when she goes swimming, when she is watching TV, and even when she is in the lavatory. Jenny decides they will have to go. But who can help her?

Note from Jane: A great book to use with anxious children as it helps sort worries through and make them seem more manageable. It emphasizes that we all have worries and what to do about them. I use this with older children too, as it always makes me get my own worries in perspective!

 

14. When Worries Get Too Big

by Kari Dunn Buron

More than any other issue, 'losing control' can cause major problems for children. Through the irresistible character of Nicholas, this book gives young children an opportunity to explore with parents or teachers their own feelings as they react to events in their daily lives while learning some useful relaxation techniques. Children who use the simple strategies presented in this charming book, illustrated by the author, will find themselves relaxed and ready to work or play.

 

15. Sitting Still Like a Frog (mindfulness)

by Eline Snell

Simple mindfulness practices to help your child deal with anxiety, improve concentration and handle difficult emotions.

 

 

Please note: two new empowering books for young children from the authors of this blog.

 

No Means No!: Teaching children about personal boundaries, respect and consent; empowering kids by respecting their choices and their right to say, 'No!'

by Jayneen Sanders

'No Means No!' is a children's picture book about an empowered little girl who has a very strong and clear voice in all issues, especially those relating to her body and personal boundaries. This book can be read to children from 3 to 9 years. It is a springboard for discussions regarding children's choices and their rights. The 'Note to the Reader' at the beginning of the book and the 'Discussion Questions' on the final pages, guide and enhance this essential discussion. It is crucial that our children, from a very young age, are taught to have a clear, strong voice in regards to their rights — especially about their bodies. In this way, they will have the confidence to speak up when they are unhappy or feel uncomfortable in any situation.

Also available in Australia from somesecrets.info

 

Kit Kitten and the Topsy-Turvy Feelings: A Story about Parents Who Aren't Always Able to Care

by Jane Evans

Once upon a time there was a little kitten called Kit who lived with a grown-up cat called Kizz Cat. Kit Kitten couldn't understand why sometimes Kizz Cat seemed sad and far away and others times was busy and rushing about. Kit Kitten was sometimes cold and confused in this topsy-turvy world and needed help to find ways to tell others about the big, medium and small feelings which were stuck inside. Luckily for Kit, Kindly Cat came along. Many children live in homes where things are chaotic and parents or carers are distracted and emotionally unavailable to them. This storybook, designed for children aged 2 to 6, includes feelings based activities to build a child's emotional awareness and vocabulary. A helpful tool for use by parents, carers, social workers and other professionals to enable young children to begin to name and talk about their feelings.

 

Complied by Jayneen Sanders and Jane Evans. 

Jayneen Sanders <http://somesecrets.info/about-the-author/> is a teacher, author, mother of three teenage daughters and an active advocate for sexual abuse prevention education both in the home and in schools.

Jane Evans <http://www.parentingposttrauma.co.uk/> is a trainer, public speaker, author and Mum. She has worked with families affected by a range of complex needs and trauma of 20 years and is committed to support everyone in raising children using only kindness.

 

Why I Wrote Some Secrets Should Never Be Kept

Many years ago when I was having a break from teaching, I worked as an editor at an educational publisher. One of the first books I ever edited was a teacher’s resource called ‘Keeping Children Safe’ by Dr Freda Briggs. It was all about teaching children body safety and it had a huge impact on me as a young woman. Many years later when I became a mother, I made sure my three daughters were educated in body safety and knew the difference between good and bad touch. Knowing I had educated them from a young age (3 years onwards), was reassuring when they went on their first sleep-over and school camp.

So when I became a school councilor at my children’s local primary school, I was shocked to find that there was no protective behaviours program in the school. Every time (and I was on school council for 7 years) I asked why not, I was put to the bottom of the agenda. I felt extremely frustrated, so I decided I would do something about it. I challenged myself to write a picture book that parents and teachers could use as a tool to open up the discussion on sexual abuse prevention. My husband was not convinced I could do it (bless him!) but I was determined I could. I had seen story used in philosophy classes with young children and I knew it was the perfect vehicle to talk to children about difficult and sensitive topics.

SS_IntEnglishPOD-FrontCov.jpg

I wrote the manuscript for ‘Some Secrets Should Never Be Kept’ about three years ago and the final book was released in October 2011. The journey to get this story published, has not been an easy one. I approached three mainstream publishers and even though I am a published author, the publishers I approached all said the same thing — it was too ‘educational’ for them. I also approached two illustrators. Both felt uncomfortable with the topic. I then approached Craig Smith, who I had worked with before, and the wonderful and talented illustrator said yes! He also said, quote: ‘This manuscript makes me feel uncomfortable but that is every reason why I should do it’. What a lovely man! His illustrations are so beautiful and sensitively done.

My husband and I have a very small publishing company — so small that we had never actually published a book. ‘Some Secrets Should Never Be Kept’ is our first! We decided about two years ago if mainstream publishers wouldn’t publish Some Secrets, we would.

Protective agencies and professionals who deal with sexually abused children have embraced this book, and we thank them for this. We do all our own marketing and many agencies have placed information about ‘Some Secrets Should Never Be Kept’ on their websites, in their newsletters and linked to us on Facebook. We rely on professionals, parents and teachers to spread the word, and we are very grateful when they do.

Returning to my original motivation for writing this book – it is really two fold: one to have sexual abuse prevention education mandatory in every state curriculum in Australia and world wide, and secondly (and for me, a very important reason) for parents to see ‘body safety’ as just a normal part of their parenting role. Parents and teachers are comfortable with educating kids about road safety and water safety – why not body safety? The statistics are 1 in 3 girls and 1 in 6 boys will be sexually abused before their 18th birthday and 93% will know their perpetrator. Surely preventative education is the key! As one reviewer of ‘Some Secrets Should Never Be Kept’ said ‘Parents or teachers can let the story do the talking, taking the pressure off them to start a conversation about abuse.’


This book can be read to kids as young as 3 through to 12. The Note to Reader and the Discussion Questions guide parents and their children through the essential discussion.

Finally, and this is my personal plea to parents — let body safety, protective behaviours or sexual abuse prevention education (whatever you choose to call it) be just a normal part of your parenting. Remember — confident children are rarely target by perpetrators. I saw a video recently of a child sexual abuser being interviewed and he said, quote: ‘I am the nice man next door, your friendly bank manager, the man you and your family go camping with. Then one day you can't go and I take your kids.’ It was chilling viewing.

We need to protect our kids and we need to talk to them about body safety. We need to do exactly what the perpetrators don’t want us to do — we need to make sure our kids are educated and that they know that some secrets should never be kept!


Thank you

Jayneen Sanders

 

Some Secrets Should Never Be Kept - Available in many languages at  https://e2epublishing.info/buy-non-english-versions

Some Secrets Should Never Be Kept - Available in many languages at https://e2epublishing.info/buy-non-english-versions

Comment

Jay Sanders

Jayneen (Jay) Sanders is an experienced primary school teacher and a successful children's book author. She is also the mother of three teenage girls and has been a primary school councillor for over seven years. Her time spent in primary schools inspired her to ask: ‘What are we doing in schools to protect our children from sexual interference?’ When she realised very little was actually being done, she decided to write a book to help parents, carers and teachers to broach the subject of self-protection and to encourage children to speak up.

Top 10 Books to Teach 'Body Safety' to Kids

Keeping Kids Safe from Inappropriate Touch

We teach our children water safety and road safety — it is equally important to teach our children ‘body safety’ from a very young age. As both a teacher and a mother, I strongly recommend to all parents that ‘body safety’ become a normal part of your parenting conversation. The sexual abuse of children has no social boundaries, and providing children with body safety skills empowers them with knowledge of what is good and bad touch.

The statistics of 1 in 3 girls and I in 6 boys will be sexually interfered with before their 18th birthday is truly frightening, and as many experts point out, this statistic only reflects reported cases. Also 93% of children will know their perpetrator. The community’s focus has so often been on ‘stranger danger’ — however, the reality is, the perpetrator will be most likely be someone in the child’s immediate family circle and a person they know and trust.

There are a number of fantastic books available to teach children body safety skills. Children are visual learners so story is an excellent medium when broaching this subject with your child. Here are my top ten.

Top Ten Books to Empower Kids About Their Bodies

1          ‘Some Secrets Should Never Be Kept’ written by Jayneen Sanders , illustrated by Craig Smith, published by Upload Publishing 2011

2          ‘My Body Belongs to Me’ written by Jill Starishevsky, illustrated by Sara Muller, published by Safety Star 2008

3          ‘Everyone’s Got a Bottom’ written by Tess Rowley, illustrated by Jodi Edwards, published by Family Planning Queensland 2007

4          ‘Matilda Learns a Valuable Lesson’ written by Holly-ann Martin, illustrated by Marilyn Fahie, published by Safe4Kids 2011

5          ‘Jasmine’s Butterflies’ written by Justine O’Malley, illustrated by Carey Lawrence, published by Protective Behaviours WA

6          ‘Amazing You’ written by Dr Gail Saltz, illustrated by Lynne Avril Cravath, published by Penguin 2005

7          ‘The Right Touch’ written by Sandy Kleven, illustrated by Jody Bergsma, published by Illumination Arts 1997

8          ‘It’s My Body’ written by Lory Freeman Girard, illustrated by Carol Deach, published by Parenting Press 1982

9          ‘I Said No!’ written by Zack and Kimberly King, illustrated by Sue Rama, published by Boulden Publishing 2008

10        ‘Your Body Belongs to You’ by Cornelia Spelman, illustrated by Teri Weidner, Albert Whitman & Company 1997

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Jay Sanders

Jayneen (Jay) Sanders is an experienced primary school teacher and a successful children's book author. She is also the mother of three teenage girls and has been a primary school councillor for over seven years. Her time spent in primary schools inspired her to ask: ‘What are we doing in schools to protect our children from sexual interference?’ When she realised very little was actually being done, she decided to write a book to help parents, carers and teachers to broach the subject of self-protection and to encourage children to speak up.